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Comparative assessment of heavy metals in soil, weed species and waste water after used for irrigation in industrial zones of Ichalkaranji city

Author Affiliations

  • 1P.G. Department of Botany, Plant Physiology Section, Krishna Mahavidyalaya, Rethare Bk., Tal-Karad, Dist –Satara, MS, India
  • 2P.G. Department of Botany, Plant Physiology Section, Krishna Mahavidyalaya, Rethare Bk., Tal-Karad, Dist –Satara, MS, India
  • 3P.G. Department of Botany, Plant Physiology Section, Krishna Mahavidyalaya, Rethare Bk., Tal-Karad, Dist –Satara, MS, India

Res.J.chem.sci., Volume 7, Issue (1), Pages 32-36, January,18 (2017)

Abstract

The toxic heavy metal concentrations in soil, weed species and waste water used for irrigation in industrial zones of Ichalkaranji were investigated. The industrial zone polluted soils showed higher levels of toxic heavy metal soil contamination as compared to non-industrial zones agricultural soils. The toxic heavy metal concentration in soils is above the maximum permissible levels for Hg (Mercury), Cd (Cadmium) and As (Arsenic) respectively. The heavy metal content of effluent, Panchaganga River and groundwater in industrial zones of Ichalkaranji were also investigated. The distribution of heavy metals reported similar patterns in weed species in the industrial zones of Ichalkaranji.

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