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Comparative Estimation of Particulate Bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Trends at Industrial and Rural Areas of Visakhapatnam, India

Author Affiliations

  • 1GITAM Institute of Science, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam-530 045, INDIA
  • 2 Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085

Res.J.chem.sci., Volume 4, Issue (10), Pages 63-71, October,18 (2014)

Abstract

US-EPA listed 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were characterized from the particulate matter samples (PM10) collected from two locations at Visakhapatnam, India during April 2011 to March 2012. The samples were collected from an industrial and a rural site using a high volume sampler. The samples were extracted with n-hexane and analysis was carried out with HPLC/ UV-VIS detector. The annual total PAHs concentrations in PM10 at industrial site ranged from 19.4 – 95.5 ngm-3 whereas at a rural site, it ranged from 7.8-36.8 ngm-3. The average total PAHs concentration at industrial site was about 2.4 times higher than that of the rural site. The monthly concentrations of total PAHs in PM10 at industrial site ranged between 20.9 – 90.1 ngm-3 and it ranged from 9.4 - 35.8 ngm-3 at rural site. The dominating PAHs at the industrial site were the high molecular weights PAHs while at rural site, the low molecular weight PAHs were dominant. The spatial variation in concentration of PAHs at two sites was mainly due to local emission sources. Significant correlation among comparative ring size PAHs showed their origin from similar sources. Potential sources of PAHs in PM10 were determined using the method of diagnostic ratios. The main sources contributing to PAHs at Industrial site were fossil fuel combustion and vehicular emission. At Rural site the potent sources contributing to PAHs were grass and wood combustion and vehicular emission, especially diesel and gasoline powered vehicles. Carcinogenicity of PAHs in terms of B(a)P equivalent concentration was found to be 3.1 ngm-3 and 1.1 ngm-3 for industrial and rural site, respectively.

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